3 Tips for Finding Entry Level Talent

With college graduation just around the corner, the job market is about to be flooded with entry-level talent looking for full-time jobs and internships. For employers, taking advantage of the influx of newly minted professionals can be as simple as having a good campus recruiting strategy in place. “College recruiting is a smart, predictable, scalable way to bring talent into any organization,” said Tey Scott, director of talent acquisition at LinkedIn. “Smart companies know they need to invest in early-in-career talent to compete in the long term. In tech in particular, getting early-in-career technical talent in the door may be the difference between being able to scale their company fast enough to deliver on product road maps or not.” The college career fair is the traditional method of on-campus recruiting, but based on LinkedIn’s success, Scott recommends implementing out-of-the-box initiatives that provide value on campus while also getting in front of targeted recruits.

“The question we asked ourselves was, what would it take to identify nearly all early-in-career talent without having to rely on physical on-campus events?” she said. “To start, we looked beyond focusing

Bad Hire Really Costing Your Business

The average cost of hiring the wrong employee is $17,000, according to research conducted by Career Builder. That means getting the hiring decision right the first time is essential, but how can hiring managers be sure they’re bringing on the right people? Conventional hiring methods follow a simple process where candidates apply based on a vague job description, several are selected for interviews, and then eventually one is selected. But oftentimes what seemed like the right fit quickly becomes a hiring error. Rex Conner, human resources consultant and author of “What if Common Sense Was Common Practice in Business?” (CreateSpace Independent Publishing, 2016) told Business News Daily the fix is simple: reduce subjectivity in the hiring process. “The biggest obstacle to hiring the right people, onboarding them, training them, evaluating and developing them is subjectivity,” Conner said. “We end up with these ridiculous conversations where an interviewer asks, ‘What’s your biggest weakness,’ and (the response) is ‘I work too much.’ That doesn’t tell you anything about the skills required.”

Given that Career Builder found nearly 60 percent of bad hires went wrong because the employee

Job Candidates Do Their Homework When Applying for Work

Job candidates are no longer comfortable applying for a job knowing very little about the position they are seeking, new research finds. A study from the outsourcing firm ManpowerGroup Solutions revealed that today’s job seekers have access to more information than ever about a company and a position in the early stages of the job search process. The research shows that compensation and the type of work they will be performing are the two most desired pieces of information prospective candidates want to know before even sending their resumes in for a job opening.

“Easy access to information has changed the way individuals find jobs and jobs find individuals,” said Jim McCoy, vice president and global practice leader for ManpowerGroup Solutions, in a statement. “As organizations across the globe continue to report difficulties filling roles, understanding candidate preferences is critical. Candidates worldwide want to be able to visualize themselves in an organization.” The study shows that on average, 45 percent of candidates in the U.S. have information about compensation prior to completing the application process. That’s far less, however, than job seekers in Asia. Nearly

Will Your CEO Leave When Times Get Tough

If you want to know whether your CEO is going to jump ship when times get tough, look at what kind of relationships they have with other professionals, new research suggests. A study recently published in the Strategic Management Journal found that a CEO’s decision to voluntarily leave a company when it starts to fail is driven by the executive’s social capital – the personal relationships they have with business colleagues and key external stakeholders. The researchers found that executives who have strong social capital as well as those who have poor social ties with business colleagues are the least likely to quit when their organizations start to suffer. It’s those right in the middle who are the least likely to stick around and ride out the ship when times get rough.

Han Jiang, the study’s lead researcher and an assistant professor at the University of Arizona, said a CEO’s decision to stay or go is ultimately a cost-benefit dilemma. He said when a company fails, an executive’s reputation could suffer dramatically, which could prompt them to leave before things get too bad. On the other hand, if they leave, they risk losing out on access to valuable company resources and

Culture of Fear for a Better Bottom Line

Company culture makes a difference for employees, which means hiring and retaining talent that effectively meets goals. If a company is leading with fear and lack of self-awareness, the company is more likely to have a high turnover. “If your organization doesn’t have a healthy culture, then two things can happen. First, the workplace environment can be unpleasant and friction-filled, which ultimately may lead to attrition by your best employees,” said Ken Staut, founder and CEO of GrowthFountain, an equity crowdfunding platform. “And second, your organization won’t reach its full potential, because not everybody within your organization shares the same values or buys into the company mission.” “People won’t stay [at the company],” said Lior Rachmany, CEO and founder of Brooklyn-based, Dumbo Moving + Storage. “If people feel overly watched or that they will get shouted out if they make a mistake, they will leave your company as soon as they can.”

That attitude comes at a price. It’s costly to replace employees. According to a CAP study, to replace an employee who earns $30,000 to $50,000 a year, it will cost a company 20 percent of that employee’s annual salary. For example, to replace an employee who makes $50,000 annually, it would

Show Employee Appreciation

Anyone can perform a task at work knowing the end result is a salary. However, passion and hard work often stems from affirmations employees hear from their boss or manager. Workers don’t just crave a paycheck — they want recognition, verbal appreciation and encouragement. Of course, it’s easy to say “thank you” or “good job” and be done with it; but there are countless ways to show your support and respect for your employees. Business News Daily asked business owners and experts to share the best ways to make your employees feel more appreciated. 1. Let employees reward one another. “[Put] the power of recognition and reward in their hands. I use apps and programs like YouEarnedIt to give my employees the power to give each other kudos for good work done. I let my team members choose their reward, too, because not everyone wants a cash bonus or a gift card.”

2. Offer employees a platform. “It could be done as a request to share. When we let people know we value what they have to offer by asking if they’d share their story, tips, methods, etc. with others, it provides validation to them that they do have something of

Hire Overqualified Candidates

Hiring managers shouldn’t be so quick to eliminate overqualified candidates from consideration for new jobs. A new study in the Academy of Management Journal revealed that employees who are considered overqualified for a job can take the position in a new, positive direction. Employees who are overqualified, up to a certain point, bring an added level of innovation and dedication to their jobs, according to the research. “A low-to-intermediate degree of perceived underemployment may drive employees to craft their jobs actively in ways that benefit the organization,” the study’s authors wrote. “Recruitment managers should not turn away job applicants who are overqualified, because such individuals, if managed appropriately, may bring creativity and organizational citizenship behavior to the organization.”

The degree to which someone is overqualified plays a critical role in determining whether or not they bring a unique perspective to their job. The study’s authors said when underemployment is perceived as too high, employees are often not motivated enough to do their jobs.

Employees who can bring a fresh perspective to how a job is done are highly valuable in today’s workplace. “Organizations today compete in a dynamic and uncertain environment in which creativity and organizational citizenship behavior are highly valuable,” the

Creating a Successful

Businesses hire interns to share their field experience with newcomers, get entry-level and administrative tasks done, and help students get the real-world experience they need to be successful. Although these student employees often work in exchange for stipends or academic credit, employers need to be careful: Interns do not equal free labor, and if you’re thinking of welcoming interns into your office, there are a few key points to consider before you make your first hire. Business News Daily spoke with legal and HR experts about providing a beneficial, legally compliant experience for your interns in a for-profit setting. The pay question: What duties are being performed? Pop culture (based on many real-life stories) makes it seem like interns’ lives revolve around making copies, standing in long lines to get everyone coffee, and answering their boss’s phone calls in the middle of the night, all without a single penny in return. However, there are tasks that an intern could be doing that would categorize them as an employee – which would mean legal entitlement to compensation.

The decision of whether to pay an intern is largely based on what the intern is doing. Adam Kemper, a labor and employment attorney for

Visa Program Faces Regulatory Changes

The H-1B visa program, which offers 85,000 visas each year to foreign skilled or specialty workers, is undergoing some changes. The program, which grants certain employers access to foreign labor when the necessary skills are not available within the U.S. workforce, is facing three major changes initiated by the executive branch to clamp down on perceived abuses. On March 31, the U.S. Customs and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that computer programmers, typically considered the lowest qualifying position for the H-1B program, would have to demonstrate that they’ve attained at least a bachelor’s degree in their field; associate’s degrees would no longer be considered acceptable. As a follow-up to this change, the USCIS announced on April 3 that “H-1B dependent employers” (companies with a workforce composition of at least 15 percent H-1B visa holders) would be subject to more stringent screenings to ensure compliance with the law.

“This identifies heavy users of H-1B visas,” Dick Burke, CEO of Envoy Global, told Business News Daily. “What (USCIS) is saying is, ‘When we make site visits for compliance, we are going to focus on H-1B dependent companies or those with a high percentage of workers working off site … in a consulting capacity.'” Then,

When it comes to managing employees

When it comes to managing employees, it can be tempting to watch your workers like a hawk. However, new research shows that granting a degree of autonomy to your employees tends to boost their job satisfaction and overall sense of well-being. Researchers at the University of Birmingham Business School found that workers given more autonomy – in the form of work from home privileges or the pace of work and deadlines – were far more likely to report feeling valued by their employers. “Greater levels of control over work tasks and schedule have the potential to generate significant benefits for the employee,” Daniel Wheatley, senior lecturer in business and labour economics at the Birmingham Business School, said in a statement. “The positive effects associated with informal flexibility and working at home offer further support to the suggestion that schedule control is highly valued and important to employees ‘enjoying’ work.”

When it comes to autonomy, the disparity between management and worker is apparent: 90 percent of those employees working in management reported “some” or “a lot” of autonomy in the workplace, while just 40 to 50 percent of non-management professionals surveyed reported experiencing autonomous working conditions. The remaining half of employees reported

Now Common for Temps and Freelancers

Full-time employees are no longer the only workers being subjected to background checks, new research shows. A study from the background screening firm HireRight revealed a significant increase in the number of organizations conducting background checks on temporary, contract and freelance workers. Specifically, 86 percent of employers are now screening contingent workers before bringing them on for any assignments. This is up 45 percent from 2012. “Contingent workers typically have the same type of access to company facilities, data, other employees and customers as full-time employees,” the study’s authors wrote. “For this reason, it’s important to thoroughly screen every worker in the same way, regardless of work status.”

While the influx of temporary workers is changing the background screening process for many employers, the decriminalization of marijuana many states have enacted is not. The study found that, despite a number of states legalizing marijuana during last year’s election, nearly 80 percent of the employers surveyed have no plans to change their drug screening policy this year.

Along with the states that allow decriminalized marijuana for personal use, 28 states now allow medical use of marijuana. “Whether or not you support the use of medical or recreational marijuana, it’s best to have a

Really Do to Your Team

Getting your new hires started off on the right foot requires more than just offering them a quick tour of the office and sending them on their way. Giving employees the best chance at future success requires a successful and thorough onboarding program, according to new research from CareerBuilder. Unfortunately, a number of employers aren’t taking those steps. The study found that 36 percent of organizations do not have a structured onboarding process in place. Not having any process in place can cause a number of negative consequences for both the employee and employer. Specifically, 16 percent of HR managers said it lowers their company’s productivity, 14 percent said it brings on greater inefficiencies and 12 percent said it leads to higher employee turnover.

Lower employee morale, lower levels of employee engagement, lower confidence among employees, a lack of trust within the organization and missed revenue targets are among the other negative impacts of not having a thorough onboarding program. “While onboarding is a critical component of setting new employees up for success from day one, this study shows some companies are neglecting fundamentals in the onboarding process – and running into serious consequences that can impact the bottom line,” Rosemary

Business Automation Impact Workers in the Gig Economy

Two trends remaking the American economy are the growth of freelancers and independent contractors – the so-called gig economy – and an expansion of automated processes. But how do the two intersect? What impact will the breakneck pace of automation have on temporary workers in the gig economy? Morag Brand, a freelancer and certified automation expert, said automation and short-term contract work are a natural pair, and that the gig economy can expect a boost in activity as a result of more businesses employing automation-focused technologies. “Automation has to start somewhere, and that’s right at the initial concept stage … but it has to be set up by someone, and this is where freelancers enter the scene,” Brand told Business News Daily. “So, yes, freelancers and contract workers should expect more work as automation expands, but it will be short bursts of ‘set up and move on,’ rather than the traditional retainer model of old. This is also cost-effective for the business owner too.”

Cristina Escalante, COO of the web and app development company The SilverLogic, said the gig economy has grown exponentially with automation technology, which paved the way for the Ubers and Airbnbs of the world.

“The gig economy was

How to Retain Increasingly Mobile Workers

As the economy improves and more job opportunities appear, workers are growing increasingly restless. According to research conducted by ADP, more than 1 in 4 people change jobs annually – an unprecedented frequency of job switching. Moreover, ADP found that 63 percent of the average employer’s workforce is open to leaving for a new job at any time, and 46 percent would leave for a job that paid the same or less than their current position. So, how can employers find and retain top talent? Sreeni Kutam, division vice president of major account services at ADP, said the findings boil down to two philosophies in conflict with one another: “me vs. we.” Employees, he said, often take the “me” perspective, asking themselves how much they can make, how they can advance and whether they’re satisfied. Employers, on the other hand, naturally take a bird’s-eye view of the organization, concerning themselves more with financial performance and overall organizational health.

“The question becomes due to the external factors – economic improvement, unemployment going down – would that tension be elevated to unprecedented levels?” Kutam said. “And we are seeing that in the marketplace.” That’s certainly alarming news for any employer who wants to

Business Owners Are Not Following Suit in the Gig Economy

The gig economy might be growing by leaps and bounds in the U.S., but small business owners are slow to embrace freelancers and independent contractors. A new survey released by small business marketing firm Manta found that most entrepreneurs prefer to employ traditional salaried employees rather than opt for more temporary or fluid work arrangements. Moreover, the minority of small business owners that do use gig economy labor don’t offer benefits to those workers, the survey results demonstrate. “With all the press the growth of the gig economy has gotten … we were expecting to see higher numbers,” Dario Ambrosini, chief operating officer at Manta, said. “These results are more in line with what we’ve seen from small businesses in the past. They mainly hire contract workers for seasonal businesses or short term projects.” According to Manta’s survey, two-thirds of small business owners do not currently employ any contractors or freelancers, and 85 percent have no plans on hiring those types of workers within the next year. Further, 73 percent said they do not utilize online labor marketplaces, such as Upwork, to find and hire freelancers.

“Small businesses tend to buck the trend and do their own thing,” Ambrosini said. “Large

Pace Yourself to Avoid Workplace Fatigue

Similar to athletes in the pool or on the track, employees need to pace themselves in the office in order to avoid burning out, new research suggests. The study from researchers at the University of Virginia and Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a model for how employees should best distribute their efforts during the day to prevent fatigue. Previous research has found that fatigue not only makes work more unpleasant, but it results in decreased productivity. When developing the model, the researchers found that employees are best served by following one of two patterns, depending on the type of job they have.

This pattern is similar to the strategy that Olympic swimmers and runners often use. The study’s authors said these athletes typically try to lower their burn rate after getting off to a strong start so they have some energy left in their tank for a strong finish. Some jobs, however, require employees to always perform at maximum intensity. This may include workers who operate machinery or provide customer service. In this “all-or-none” scenario, the researchers say the best pattern for employees to follow is to begin and end the day with “on” periods, but take breaks during the day.

Encourage Employees to Volunteer

Creating a culture of volunteerism within your company doesn’t just help others, it also helps your organization, new research finds. A study from Deloitte revealed that employers who encourage and promote volunteering boost morale, workplace atmosphere and brand perception. The research found that an overwhelming majority – 89 percent – of employees think organizations that sponsor volunteer activities offer a better overall working environment. In addition, 70 percent believe volunteer activities are more likely to boost staff morale than company-sponsored happy hours, with more than three-quarters saying volunteering is essential to employee well-being.

Nearly 70 percent of employees are not volunteering as much as they would like to, with nearly two-thirds of those saying part of the reason is because they aren’t able to dedicate any time during the day to volunteer. “Employers have an opportunity to build on their volunteerism programs by creating a culture that celebrates volunteering and empowers volunteers to be more active,” said Doug Marshall, managing director of corporate citizenship for Deloitte LLP, said in a statement. In addition to providing more opportunities to volunteer, employers can do a better job of making sure employees, especially younger ones, know the benefits of doing so.

Three-quarters of the millennials surveyed

Social Media Screenings Gain in Popularity

If you think that your Facebook and Twitter profiles won’t be looked at when you’re applying for a job, think again. The vast majority of employers are now searching through candidates’ social media accounts as part of the hiring process, new research finds. A study from CareerBuilder revealed that 70 percent of employers now use social media to screen job candidates before hiring them, up from 60 percent a year ago and 11 percent in 2006. Many employers are also moving beyond social networks when checking out potential employees online. Nearly 70 percent are using online search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing to research candidates as well, compared to just 59 percent last year.

While the fear of having something embarrassing or negative discovered might tempt some job candidates to try and completely erase their online persona, employers say that strategy can backfire for many job seekers. One-quarter of hiring managers expect candidates to have some sort of online presence, and nearly 60 percent are less likely to call someone in for interview if they can’t find them online.

According to the report, job seekers frequently research details about on-the-job lifestyle factors, including benefits and schedule flexibility as well as

The Age of Well Informed Job Candidates

According to the report, job seekers frequently research details about on-the-job lifestyle factors, including benefits and schedule flexibility as well as the type of work that will be expected of them if hired. The most important criteria, however, is compensation. Currently, 44 percent of candidates know compensation details about a position before applying, and this level of transparency is only increasing. “Easy access to information has changed the way individuals find jobs and jobs find individuals,” said Jim McCoy, vice president and global practice leader at ManpowerGroup Solutions. “As organizations across the globe continue to report difficulties filling roles, understanding candidate preferences is critical.” ManpowerGroup Solutions offers the following advice for employers and hiring managers to help with recruiting efforts. Reach the right talent where they are Understand that candidates are gleaning much of their information from your company’s website, so it’s important to prioritize the creation of content that is both brand relevant and high quality. Be open to new conversations and new ways of having them You must be willing to be fully transparent with today’s information-hungry candidates – especially related to compensation. Monitor the buzz Monitor conversations about your company on social media and career sites like

The Department of Labor’s Overtime Rule Change

A U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) rule change that would extend overtime protections to an estimated 4.2 million workers was temporarily halted by an injunction after 21 states sued in District Court. The DOL subsequently appealed the decision and is awaiting a decision in the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. Below is an overview of the previous rule, which the DOL is expected to revisit and significantly revise after abdicating its defense of the Obama-era rule in court. The DOL has, however, maintained that it has the authority to set such a rule governing salary thresholds under the law.

The amendment to minimum wage and overtime regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act was set to go into effect Dec. 1, and would have lifted long-standing exemptions and raised the pay threshold from $23,660 annually to $47,476. Positions once considered executive, administrative or professional would be subject to overtime pay as well, and the pay threshold would be indexed to wage growth and updated once every three years.

“This [rule change] definitely will take merchants by surprise if they’re not careful and don’t pay attention,” Mark Schulze, co-founder of smart point-of-sale system Clover, told Business News Daily. “It’s a big change, so